Health

5 Reasons to Get a Massage This Fall

As summer weather comes to a crawl and the feeling of fall becomes more prominent, it’s important to allow our bodies to relax and recover from the hype of summer activities. For most, summer is the most active of all seasons because children aren’t in school, family vacations are more frequent (YEAH!), and the warm weather and longer days allow us to be outside more. With the busyness of our lives, it’s not uncommon for people to feel exhausted by the time autumn rolls around as our lives and routines fall back into place.   continue reading »

Benefits of Using Coconut Oil for Massages

When you get a professional massage, the therapist typically applies some sort of oil or cream that lubricates the skin, making it easier for the therapist to manipulate the area and more comfortable for the patient. It may come as a surprise to learn that coconut oil is a popular choice by massage therapists for several reasons. Here are a few of the benefits: continue reading »

4 Ways to Massage Away A Headache

In the United States, 45 million Americans suffer from chronic headaches. Headaches can be debilitating and career ending. Chronic headaches create added stress at work, at home and in everyday life. Massage can be a very important tool for relieving chronic headaches. It can be used proactively to prevent headaches and also retroactively to help relieve a headache that is already in full swing. Let’s look at some ways that massage can help with headaches. continue reading »

5 Reasons to Get a Massage This Summer

While many people think of massage as a treat for special occasions, the truth is that regular massage can be extremely beneficial, especially during the summer months. Here are five reasons why you should consider getting a massage this summer: continue reading »

New research shows massage may help with knee osteoarthritis

Massage has long been used to help reduce pain and stiffness for people with arthritis. A new study, published in December 2018, adds more evidence in support of this practice. A team of researchers in North Carolina, New Jersey and Connecticut showed regular massage can decrease pain and stiffness for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Their research was published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.  continue reading »

“My energy levels are like night and day”

Christine’s assessments, alignment corrections, neuromuscular and lymphatic drainage sessions always help me feel better physically, plus I have more energy. When my allergies/sinuses or stomach are giving me issues, I know Christine will clear them up. My energy levels are like night and day after a lymphatic drainage session. It’s amazing because I don’t need to take any medications, yet my body is able to heal itself after Christine uses her knowledge and magic touch skills. I had a feeling I had alignment issues and Christine validated that by taking measurements to show me where my alignment was off. Christine’s extensive knowledge of the body systems has healed medical issues that multiple specialists could not solve. You will not find someone with her training and specialties at Massage Envy and Christine is worth it.

(Aimee M. –  7/31/2019)

More about Fascia & Your Health

Fascia is the connective tissue that forms a matrix of support around the body and within every layer of the body from our muscles and bones to our muscle cells.

“Fascia surrounds every muscle, every bundle within muscles, groups of muscles, it surrounds every nerve, every artery, every vein, all the lymph vessels. These are all embedded in envelopes of fascial tissue. Fascia also forms large envelopes around the whole body,” says Til Luchau, author of Advanced Myofascial Techniques.

Magnified under a microscope, fascia looks like spider webs. It has six times more sensory nerve endings than muscle. Like many other systems of the body, fascia is adaptive and responds to stress both externally (environment) and internally (within the body).

Years ago, fascia was regarded as packing material within the body and thrown out by anatomists during cadaver dissections. The more accepted belief today is fascia is its own system. Medical research and tests are lagging behind, evident in that fascia does not show up on MRI scans, CT scans or X-Rays. Many experts believe that fascia is the missing piece of the puzzle to chronic pain and illness. Source: Aiyana Fraley at www.massagemag.com

 

FASCIA: Here, There, & Everywhere!

By Rachel Damiani and Ted Spiker

Americans, who spend about $8 billion a year in massage and chiropractic treatments to relieve pain, may have no idea that they’re all probably experiencing the same thing—a manipulation of their fascia, a three-tiered layer of tissue that encases tissues and organs.

Although some people may have a vague notion that fascia exists, they probably don’t know much about their fascia—or understand why it even matters.

Fascia is the only tissue that modifies its consistency when under stress. It’s everywhere in the body, so it could affect just about everything. That leaves researchers wrestling with an intriguing dilemma: If fascia is everywhere, then how do you isolate its impact on the body?

Early research suggests it may have relevance in areas one wouldn’t normally think of fascia playing a role, such as digestive conditions and cancer.

“Fascia is what holds us together. There are very few diseases that don’t have a fascia component,” said Frederick Grinnell, a professor of cell biology at the UT Southwestern Medical School.

In an article in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, researchers make the point that this web throughout our body has the potential to influence everything.

“Fascia is involved almost everywhere in the body,” said Andreas Haas, the founder of the Manus Training Center and the Manus Fascia Center in Austria who has been a manual therapist for 30 years and looking at fascia for two decades. “Each organ, each muscle, each artery, each vein, each nerve—there is not one single structure in the whole body that is not connected with fascia or not enveloped by fascia.”

What is fascia?

There’s fascia that appears all over and acts like a casing—a biological Spanx of sorts. This fascia throughout the body holds muscles and organs in place to make sure they don’t jostle around.

The characteristic of fascia that is at the forefront of discussion in terms of health implications is its elasticity—that is, higher elasticity of the fascia allows organs and tissues to function better, while stiffer fascia decreases performance.

Long thought of as just the support structure, fascia may have more influence on health than as a passive container.

Why does it matter?

Fascia’s main functions are helping coordinate the body’s movements, position in space, and fluid flow throughout the body.

Beyond movement conditions, fascia may also be involved in a variety of unexpected health conditions and diseases, including cancer, lymphedema, and gastrointestinal distress.

By releasing fascia through bodywork, it could be possible that fascia becomes more pliable, lymphatic fluid flow increases and swelling goes down. Similarly, releasing fascia could help reduce gastrointestinal distress, including constipation, bloating and acid reflux.  Source: www.washingtonpost.com

 

7 Ways to Improve Energy Using Massage

Massage therapy has been around for centuries. The ancient texts of many languages, including Chinese, Indian, Greek and Egyptian mention it. While the exact roots of massage therapy are unknown, it is known that getting regular massages is beneficial for the recipients. Massage can treat everything from aches and pains, digestive issues, insomnia and more. continue reading »

Why You Need to Get Massage Therapy this Fall

As summer unwinds and fall begins, it’s time for us to allow our bodies to do the same.

Typically, summer is the most active of all seasons. The kids are out of school, vacations are aplenty, the weather is consistently nice and we participate in a many outdoor activities we may not normally do throughout the rest of the year. With all this going on at once, we expend a lot of energy. It isn’t surprising that some of us tend to feel tired by summer’s end. continue reading »